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Dean Madonia: Press

Shadow To Shadow, Dean Madonia's Frankenstein

A HORROR ROCK TALK WITH DEAN MADONIA


Horror music isn't just what you hear on Halloween: country is filled with ghosts (usually of Hank Williams) and devils (that prefer Georgia), and even progressive rock can enter the occult. Pop music can get downright grizzly - especially that song where the kid gets eaten.

Dean Madonia studies this stuff. A Nashville songwriter by trade, he teaches workshops on the craft and lectures about the history of horror in music. His magnum opus is Shadow to Shadow, Dean Madonia's Frankenstein, a two-disc progressive rock album based on Mary Shelley's novel, Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus. It's a compelling and often heartbreaking journey that has caught on with those who like a cerebral musical scare.

In this conversation, Dean breaks down the songs from the album and shares his thoughts on horror in music.

Laura Antonelli (Songfacts): You're a big horror fan. You give lectures about horror in music. What can someone expect when attending them and what songs do you cover?

Dean Madonia: I always talk about horror in general. I love horror fiction. Harlan Ellison wrote an amazing story back in the '60s called I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream about a sadistic, God-like robot that's basically torturing these people on this planet. Robert W. Chambers, The King in Yellow, Thomas Ligotti's Songs of a Dead Dreamer. I read all the old stuff, of course, like Dracula, Frankenstein, and Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. I would talk about the books that inspired or furthered the horror genre.

I would then probably talk about art. One of my favourite paintings is The Raft of the Medusa by Théodore Géricault, which is a picture of a life raft that's thrown together after the sinking of a real ship. It was actually a real event. He basically locked himself in a room with a bunch of corpses and posed them and painted for weeks. He locked himself in there until it was done.

And then you get to music. There have always been a lot of horror elements in country. Charlie Daniels, "The Devil Went Down to Georgia," "Ghost Riders in the Sky" – my Dad liked that song. "Brand 309," where there's a ghost truck and the guy that swerves to avoid the busload of kids. Or Hugh Prestwood wrote "Ghost in this House," which is one of my favourite songs. Alison Krauss recorded that one, too. Or David Allan Coe's "The Ride" or "Midnight in Montgomery" - both talk about meeting the ghost of Hank Williams.

Probably two of my favourite horror songs, one of them I heard when I was a kid. It's called "Timothy." It was written by Rupert Holmes, the guy that wrote the Pina Colada song. He wrote it for this band, The Buoys. They were about to lose their deal and he was just trying to do something that would get people's attention so he wrote a song about a bunch of miners that get trapped in a cave-in and they eat Timothy. And that song, for some reason, I was just a kid when I heard it, and it just stuck with me. I wanted to know every word of that song.

The progressive rock band, UK, has a song called "Rendezvous 6:02" where a guy takes a ride on a train that doesn't exist anymore. It's kind of like that old story A Wild Ride In a Tote Cart where the kid rides on this cart in bad weather behind this crazy guy and he jumps off just before it goes around the corner. It turns out it's the dead guy. It's like Large Marge from Pee-wee's Big Adventure. And then of course Blue Öyster Cult is loaded with supernatural themed songs: "(Don't Fear) The Reaper," "Godzilla," "Joan Crawford," "Veteran of the Psychic Wars," and "I Love the Night."

Songs like "Sympathy for the Devil," "Angie Baby" by Helen Reddy, "Maxwell's Silver Hammer" – it's more of a crazed, serial killer guy, which isn't usually my favourite type of horror, but I love that song. There are a lot of supernatural elements in Warren Zevon's work: "Werewolves of London" and "Excitable Boy." And then the more modern stuff: Rob Zombie's "Dragula" and "Living Dead Girl." Or the perennial staples, "Thriller" and "Monster Mash" for Halloween. Everybody wants to hear those songs all the time.

Songfacts: So do you just analyze them?

Dean: I just talk a little bit about the history of music. I don't have any notes with me right now but just that kind of stuff. The whole metal scene was made on being scary - Iron Maiden with their skull guy. It was a little bit over-the-top silly, a cultish type of vibe. Even bands that didn't have a big cult theme like Led Zeppelin who hadn't a cult profile but some of the members of the band did. Didn't Jimmy Page buy Aleister Crowley's old castle or something like that? I don't remember if that's true or not. [yep, it's true]

And then the modern stuff, which I don't really care for, the rap music, which they call Horrorcore. It's just about death too much. It's mean and just screaming stuff really violent. I don't care for the violence. I know there's some violence in the Frankenstein thing but it's obviously fictional. I don't like music, art, movies or books that are overloaded with gore. To me, that's not horror - serial killers or any of that kind of stuff. I don't really care for that because I don't like songs that advocate violence. A good example is Eminem's "Kim" or Korn's "Daddy" or "Down with the Sickness" by Disturbed. Those are more screamo than those last two.

When I started looking into it, there's a lot more horror still in music. It just isn't making it to the mainstream and it hasn't for some time. The last one I remember is maybe Live, "The Dam at Otter Creek," because I think they're burying a body. "The Dam at Otter Creek" was the last song that I remember hearing on the radio in the '90s that has a lot of horror in it. That and Rob Zombie's "Dragula" and "Living Dead Girl." Most of that stuff doesn't seem to make it into the mainstream and onto radio. I'm still looking into it but there seems to be a large sub-culture of horror in music. It's just not mainstream.

Songfacts: Why do you think it doesn't hit the mainstream?

Dean: It's hard to do well. The Horrorcore stuff that's just yelling, saying nasty stuff, and talking about dismembering people, most people don't want to hear that. It's just like the movies. You have to do something that makes people think and you have to care about the characters. It's hard to do that in a three or four minute song, which is why I did the whole 29-track CD. I wanted people to like the monster and Victor a little bit in the beginning and then see how they alter to the point where they just hate each other and they want the other one dead.

Songfacts: You've been living in Nashville for the past 12 years writing country music. Do you approach writing progressive rock songs differently than writing country songs?

Dean: Yeah, each genre has certain rules. Country is loaded with them. There's a certain length of an intro. There's a certain length of a song. There's a certain amount of time before the chorus needs to hit. There are a lot of particulars for country music.

If you're writing progressive, it doesn't have to have all these things in it, but you find odd time signatures that you would never find in any other genre. Once in awhile, a straight ahead rock song will sneak through that has an odd time signature on it. There are also a lot of solos. I personally didn't want to go too crazy with a lot of long solos on this album because the '70s were a little bit overindulgent with it. The solos got a little too long and they made people go into a small coma. It alienated the possible fans. There's a lot of chaff to sift through to get to the wheat in progressive music. The best progressive music is my favourite music. There's such a small body of it but the stuff that's really good is great. I don't want to say anything bad about anybody's stuff.

I will say the songs that I like in the progressive genre, like "Rendezvous 6:02" is a perfect song. I love that song. It's one of the few songs that uses an odd time signature for a good reason. The main character in the song steps through this arch that isn't there. It's like he goes into the twilight zone and that's when the odd time signature comes in so it's well used. It's like having sex in a story or movie. If it's there because it supports the story then it's a good idea. If you're just doing it because it says that you're supposed to have sex scenes in the movie then it's usually crap and it's just a distraction. So that makes the field, in my opinion, of prog a lot more difficult to try to be musical and melodic yet introduce some of those elements without saying, "Okay, here comes the part where we count in 6/8 and here's the part where we count in 7/8 or 20 bars." It's obviously like a math problem instead of feeling the music. That's hard. It was hard for me to slide that difference and draw the influences of prog but still try to be musical and have the songs be melodic. Yes is great at it. They had a lot of hits because they're so melodic and they write good songs, and they also happen to be a prog band. "Roundabout" and "Carry on Wayward Son" are two landmark, great songs in prog rock, there are plenty of them, but I love those two songs.

Dean's rock opera Shadow to Shadow, Dean Madonia's Frankenstein puts a twist on the classic story by telling it from the perspective of the monster 200 years later. The story is told from monster's-eye-view as a caution to a genetic researcher about to make the first human clone.


Songfacts: Why did you decide to write a rock opera about Frankenstein and make that change in the narrative?

Dean: Well, I think Frankenstein is arguably the first modern horror book and it's also arguably the first science fiction book. Those are two of my favourite subjects to read. I've read it quite a few times and I just love the story.

I wanted to do a concept album for some time. I just didn't know what I was going to do it about and so this started as a side project. I asked a few friends what they thought about Frankenstein. Obviously the story's in public domain. I don't think I have the writing skills to write a whole story and the concept album with music and lyrics. It was a lot just to do this one. Maybe I'll try an original concept album sometime but I thought that it would be a good opportunity to explore a lot of complex and deep emotional territory. The same reason that Mary Shelley wrote the book in the first place.

Songfacts: And why did you decide to make that change in the narrative with the monster telling the story instead of Walton writing the letters to his sister?

Dean: The story is really complicated for people that aren't good readers or don't read a lot of older fiction because of that Chinese puzzle box narrative with Captain Walton. So I tried to straighten the story out chronologically. I had to make a chart to figure out when everything happened because it jumps around a lot in the book.
The Chinese box in literature is a tool that is used to tell a story within a story. Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus by Mary Shelley uses the Chinese box technique, which complicates the narrative. The point of view changes from the captain of the ship, Robert Walton, to the eccentric scientist, Victor Frankenstein, then the monster Frankenstein creates, and, finally, back to Walton and the letters that he writes to his sister.
I considered first having somebody do one of the parts. One person is Victor Frankenstein and one is the monster. I didn't want to be held hostage by any person who maybe wasn't one hundred percent into it or might change their mind or be unavailable later. So I thought, "How can I make this story all told by the monster?" The way that could happen is that he's telling it to somebody else. I decided to make it a genetic researcher because I feel like that's the modern significance as a cautionary tale of Frankenstein - just be careful what kinds of seeds you plant because the fruit might not be what you want. So by having the monster telling the whole story to the genetic researcher, I made it so it could be just one vocalist. I didn't want it to become a musical so that was another consideration.

Songfacts: It took you four years to create. It was written in airports, planes, and hotel rooms while you were traveling for shows.

Dean: Yeah, pretty much anywhere I could write. I had Frankenstein on the brain. I wrote it in my car while I was driving recording music and lyric ideas in my phone.

Songfacts: So describe the songwriting process for it. Did you take that long on purpose?

Dean: Well, I live in Nashville and I've been writing country since 2002. I basically came to a point where I felt like I needed a break from trying to write a hit every single time I got out of bed. I felt confined in that country-pop box that you have to write in to even have a chance to get a song on the radio. It's like riding in a small car for a long time. You have to get out and stretch your legs. I felt like I'd been riding in my Corolla [laughs] and I needed to get out and stretch out a little bit. I felt like I could do a lot more lyrically and musically than I was allowed to do within that box. I decided to just start it as a side project and then at some point it took over. I don't know when but it took over full time. I basically told all my co-writers that I was taking a break for a year just to finish writing and start recording this album. So I didn't really want it to take four years. It's just with my touring schedule and I'm a Dad. I'm a scout leader if you can imagine. I'm just so busy. I hardly see my family at all. So I couldn't just throw myself into it as if I was in my early 20s and single. I think I kind of did that anyhow. In fact, I might have at one point jeopardized my relationship with my wife because I was just so focused on this CD and trying to finish it up.

Songfacts: "Running from the Moon" is when the monster first comes to life and Victor is terrified of its hideous exterior and abandons the creature. What was the process for writing that song?


Dean: [Long pause] That particular song, I had it in my head. I read that book so many times. I had it in my head that Victor had worked himself to the point of exhaustion trying to do this thing and then when he realized that it wasn't what he thought it was going to be, he completely has a meltdown, freaks out, and he's just trying to get away. The point of it is that once you create something like that it can't be undone. Just like someday when they make the first human clone. Well, that will be the answer to a lot of questions that people have, but it can't be undone.

So I really wanted to write something that was kind of freaky. I actually had the intro for that song as an instrumental. One day I had that idea and just put it down. I used that intro verbatim and then I tacked on that second half of the song.

A lot of the songs were like that. Some of them I started with the lyrics. Some of them I had an old song that sounded like a horror song to me that I thought would be perfect for a particular scene.

That one, I felt like the madness of the intro sounds like somebody going crazy or at least it makes you uncomfortable, which is the feeling I was trying to provide. It's an odd time signature and it makes you a little twitchy until it resolves into the 4/4.

Songfacts: "When He Plays His Guitar" is when the monster witnesses the blind elderly man that lives in the cottage play a guitar for the first time. How did that song come about?

Dean: I was trying to think about what it would be like for somebody like the monster who's basically just a giant baby to experience music for the first time. It describes in the book that he's just overcome with emotions that he doesn't understand. It just made me think about the effect of music on people in general.

I tried to keep a lot of the ideas more general instead of Frankenstein specific. They do tell that story about Frankenstein but you probably would have to be somewhat familiar with the novel to understand what's happening on my album. The movies are always terrible as usual [laughs].

I thought about a particular guitar player that I work with who is amazing. He can just sit there and play for hours on the floor of his room, and just playing by himself for hours and hours every day. I kind of had that in mind when I was writing it.

Songfacts: "Fool's Gold" is when Victor has just learned of his brother's death and returns home to clear his housekeeper's name that is accused of the murder but he sees the monster and realizes what has really happened. Describe the songwriting process for that one.


Dean: I thought of the title first for that one, which made it easy because I was thinking of the saying that silence is golden. I was thinking, "Well, what if silence isn't golden?" Most of the songs on this album have more than one meaning. They have a meaning for Frankenstein but that's also about speaking out about injustice that you see. If you don't say anything than you're part of the problem. I felt like if silence is not golden than it's like fool's gold. People sometimes get a mantra in their head like "silence is golden" and they follow that like it's some kind of a law, but you have to use your brain on every issue.

Frankenstein was concerned that:

Number One: Nobody would believe him if he tried to blame the death on the monster.

Number Two: He figured that everybody would hate him if they did believe him about the monster for making the monster.

And Number Three: He believed that the justice system would clear Justine Moritz of the murder but the monster planted a locket on her to incriminate her. She also confesses because back then they used to, and probably still are, rough on you to get a confession. So she just confessed to the murder even though she didn't do it and she ends up being hanged.

It's basically about not trusting everybody else to do the right thing. If you know the right thing and you have an answer, if you're a witness to something, then you need to come forward and help out. You can't just expect that it's going to get cleared up by other people. That's also the message.

Songfacts: How did you come up with the song "Shadow to Shadow?" It's when the monster demands Victor to create a wife for him and you named the entire rock opera after it.

Dean: Yeah, I thought that best summed up the monster's plight. Every foray that he makes into the public is met with some sort of minor or major disaster. He's been shot and yelled at and chased with a broom. He's been misunderstood and hit by the son of the blind guy. People judge him. It's true not just for the monster but this is for any people that are disenfranchised. They judge them by how they look and if they're good looking or not good looking. They judge people if they are rich or poor. They judge them based on their nationality or skin colour, so it's for all people. The shadow to shadow thing is him constantly having to stay out of people's sight and hide in the shadows, and it's kind of the way he lives from shadow to shadow.

Songfacts: "Pale Student," "Frightful Fiend," and "Did I Request Thee?" are spoken word songs of quotations from the novel. How did you decide which ones to include in the rock opera?

Dean: That was kind of rough. I always loved the "Frightful Fiend" and "Did I Request Thee" quotes. I think I'd heard them before I had read Frankenstein. One of them is from Milton's Paradise Lost, which is one of the books that the monster reads. I had actually selected a lot of quotes from the book. I decided to just use those two that Mary Shelley had also quoted so I didn't feel as bad about quoting them because she quoted them, too. And then the first quote is from the introduction to the 1831 version where she explains how she came up with the idea for Frankenstein, so I thought that should go right at the beginning. It sums up a lot of the feel of it.

Songfacts: What song took the longest to write?


Dean: Oh, that's a hard one. "Running from the Moon" was certainly one of them. And "Into the White" because I added another part in that song. Most of the rest of them I wrote quickly, surprisingly.

I re-wrote the lyrics a million times on all of them. I tweaked it daily. I went through all of the lyrics and tried to delete stuff that was unnecessary or make the song better. I always release an album and then ten years later I look at it and say, "Why did I say that? I could have said this." I really went through this one more than usual so I'm not going to do that hopefully [laughs], but we'll see.

Songfacts: What's your favourite moment in the entire rock opera?

Dean: [Long pause] I feel like track 26, "Spark Redux." I do take quite a bit of time establishing that Victor really does love Elizabeth on "The Sweetest Part of Me," which is track 23, and then the murder of her. There are three songs in a row about him dealing with her death. The first one, he laments her death. The second one, he laments but he's going super insane. That "Spark Redux" is a pivotal moment. And then "Into the Cold," he just totally loses it and he's going after the monster. I felt like if I was an editor - I would have said - if I was a label telling me, "Look, dude, there are three songs about the same exact thing. Why don't you take two of them and make them into one long song and dump one of them?" I liked all of those songs so much that I just had to do it. It takes about 12 minutes to get through it in real time. He's just losing it slowly with each thing. It's kind of like the five stages of grief.

Songfacts: Do you think in the end the genetic researcher listens to the monster's cautionary tale and actually learns something from it?

Dean: I'm going to say in the real world, no. In my story, I'd like to believe that she gets the message.

I'm not anti-science. I love science and science fiction. If you read enough science fiction, you don't get so scared about all the stuff that's going to happen in the future because you already read about it a long time ago and it's not that big of a surprise when it happens. You don't turn into a Luddite like a lot of people. I'm not against science. I did want it to be a cautionary tale. I just believe that there are a lot of people with good intentions that develop technologies and then there's always somebody who has an idea on how they can use it in a way that isn't possibly the best moral choice. For instance, the technologies we use for war. It's the same thing. There's a lot of potential for abuse with cloning and there's a lot of potential for amazing breakthroughs, too.

Let's put it this way, if you watch Star Wars, most people watch it and they see Luke Skywalker and Han Solo as the heroes. But there are a handful of them that think, "Hey! That Darth Vader and the Emperor, they had a pretty good idea. We should probably use that." That's the two kinds of people there are in this world. So I like to believe that the genetic researcher is the Han Solo and that she's the fan of the good guys and that she would get that. But, at the same time, she's probably going to do it because somebody else will do it if she doesn't and she might as well get the glory for it.

I'm working on a graphic novel. It's going slow because I had a lot of things come up. I'm just trying to promote the CD right now and see if anybody likes it before I finish the graphic novel. If I was really ambitious then it's 200 years of time that this monster's lived. He's probably had a lot of different occupations. It could be an amazing series for a graphic novel - the whole 200 years that the monster lived between the time of Victor's death and the time he meets this genetic scientist. It could flashback from her and his life leading up to that. It could go on forever [laughs]. 200 years of storylines.

Songfacts: Yeah, that's a really cool idea. You're also an artist so what inspired you to come up with that idea for the graphic novel?

Dean: I just kind of always wanted to do it. When I was a kid, I used to draw comics all the time. But I was a slob and terrible at lettering. I never planned it out well enough but now they have all these programs where you can put the text letters in afterward. So I can do the artwork completely separate. I was always a fan of Night Gallery, I thought it would be cool if I could show all the artwork in the lobby for this thing and have a full show sometime but that's a ways off.

Songfacts: You wrote the song "(I Called Her) Tennessee" that Tim Dugger ended up recording. How did that come about?

Dean: A friend of mine was producing this kid, Tim. He has a production company and sends a lot of his artists over to write with me. Tim came over and we wrote this song and it just turned out great. It was one of those songs that we didn't have the title first, which makes it harder to write sometimes. He just wanted to write a song about partying and spring break and I was like, "Well, I lived in Fort Lauderdale for 20 years so I know a little bit about that." We ended up writing this song. When we got to the chorus, we were trying to use a lot of imagery. I remembered that we said that when he met her she was sitting on a UT blanket. I remembered some people that I've known that we just called them by their state name: "Okay, there Michigan. Okay, Alabama." And it was like, "Hey, I never knew her name so I called her Tennessee," and we both looked at each other and were like, "Yes!" So that was like a gift. It just came.

Songfacts: You've also had songs placed in movies. "Honor is Ours" is in Foodfight! and "Just Like Love" from your old band, Pretty Little Horses, is in the movie, The Stream. Explain how that all happened.


Dean: This friend of mine, Keith, also has a production company. I write some stuff for him, too. He had an in with this company, Threshold Entertainment. They wanted some songs for this movie [Foodfight!]. We actually wrote about five of them - Keith Ridenour, myself, and my friend, Scott Avery. We wrote about five songs and Keith wrote with some other writing groups, too. He got a couple of other songs in the movie but we got this one in. I looked at the scenes and saw the description of what they wanted. They described that slot as somewhere between Prince and Pink Floyd. I was thinking, "Well, I kind of get what they are saying." They were probably trying to do something like "Another Brick in The Wall." It has the same kind of hi-hat pattern almost like a Prince song. So I tried to do a Prince hi-hat drum thing with a Pink Floyd delayed guitar thing. I thought that scene was going to be the easiest one to get because everybody wasn't going to be all crazy about it.

At that time, people were still all worked up about the war so I was trying to think of it from the soldier's point of view, even though the song was written for cartoon characters. I just tried to forget about that and think about these people going to war. They could die and that's what we're writing about. My friend, Scott Avery, basically ended up writing most of the lyrics, though. We talked about it and sent drafts back and forth, but most of it was just him.

Pretty Little Horses, I did that album with a friend of mine, Greg Curvey. He's in a band called The Luck of Eden Hall. It's a psychedelic band. We've known each other for years and we hadn't seen each other for awhile. We ran into each other and I was saying, "We should record something." So we did that as a long distance collaboration. He ended up getting a chance to score the film, The Stream. He's actually the composer that did the whole score. They asked him for a song and he gave them that one from Pretty Little Horses.

That's another side project I did during the time that I was doing Frankenstein so that was another thing that made Frankenstein take longer because I got sidetracked with that project. I really like that project and I was happy that it got in that movie. They actually just got picked up for worldwide distribution now. It's going to be on Amazon and iTunes as well. I'm hoping that maybe we'll record a Pretty Little Horses 2. I'd like to see a little bit of interest somehow through this movie and maybe spark a second album.

Songfacts: So, last question. You also play dueling pianos shows. What has your experience been like doing that?

Dean: I started playing dueling pianos in 1998 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida at Howl at the Moon. It was basically an extension of somebody telling me a long time ago to do it instead of getting in bands all the time, which takes up all your time. If you're a writer, what you want is to have the most time available to write and record. When you get in a band, you have rehearsals, you have people leaving, and you have to move the equipment. If you do it solo, it will free up a bunch of your time. I was still in some bands but not travelling and playing six nights a week.

I started doing a lot of solo stuff. When I got offered that job at Howl at the Moon, I took it because it was basically going from being a solo act that was carrying around a full PA, a piano, a guitar, and microphones, to being the guy that walks in with a microphone and just sits down and plays piano. It's basically the most money you can make for the least amount of time. It's what the original idea was to free up time to write and record. It's been good to me so no complaints.

Songfacts: I think that's everything. Is there anything else you want to add?

Dean: Not really. I was fully immersed in this album for four years and I'm just coming out of it now. I have some kind of post-project hangover from it. I'm just trying to get back into my normal writing schedule. I feel like this is my best writing. I stretched out as far as I have the ability to stretch out on this album. I think I wrote as good of songs as I could based on the subject matter, and hopefully people will listen to it.

October 23, 2014. Get Shadow to Shadow and more info at deanmadonia.com.
ABOUT THE AUTHOR:


Laura Antonelli
From Oshawa, Ontario, Laura comes from the world of radio broadcasting and English lit. She fell in love with music through film when she first watched Dirty Dancing, Grease, and Saturday Night Fever at an inappropriately young age. Since then, she has been fascinated by all genres of music and the inspirations, influences, and processes that are used to create it. Get her on Twitter at twitter.com/Louda
Dean Madonia

Shadow to Shadow Dean Madonia's Frankenstein

Review by G. W. Hill
A concept album, this is mostly progressive rock, but there are some other things here, as well. Everything here works exceptionally well. The vocal hooks and vocal performances are, in many ways, the best thing going on here. That’s not to say the music isn’t great. It is exceptional. It’s just that the vocals manage to really shine above and beyond that. I should say that I expected something a bit creepier than this, but I’m not really disappointed either.




Track by Track Review

Disc 1

Pale Student (Spoken)
As the parenthetical insinuates, this is a short spoken introduction.


The Living Proof
There is a real pop country sound to this piece.

Chimera
This piece is symphonic and more than a little creepy.

What I Believe
There is quite a bit of funk in this. It’s the more purely progressive rock oriented piece to this point on the disc, though. It rocks hard, but has plenty of shifts and changes and other oddities.

The Spark of Life
With some symphonic elements at play, this is another smoking hot progressive rock piece. In fact, I like this even better than the previous one. This reaches some incredible heights. It also has some quirky moments late.

Alive Anew
This is a very dynamic piece. It starts very mellow and atmospheric. Some processed spoken vocals are heard on the early sections. It works out to a killer progressive rock jam after a time, though. This is one of the strongest songs of the whole set.


Frightful Fiend (Spoken)
Here we get another short spoken section to move the story along.

Running from the Moon
A powerhouse fast paced progressive rock jam brings this into being. It works through some shifts and changes as it continues and is a real winner. It’s another of the standouts here. It really is quite a diverse piece.

Trusted Friend
This is a piano based progressive rock ballad. It’s quite strong.

He Calls Me
More hard edged progressive rock, this one borders on metal at times. It’s another powerful one. It has some great hooks and just works really well. The mellow drop back section has a great multi-layered vocal arrangement.

When He Plays His Guitar
Acoustic guitar based, this gentle piece is folk prog. It’s another good tune, but not a stand out.

Let Me In
A mellower prog ballad, this is pretty and quite effective. It’s got some powerfully evocative moments and some great hooks.

Wrong
Although this is faster paced, it lands more toward the melodic end of progressive rock. I really love some of the keyboard work on this thing. It’s a soaring number with some definite shifts and turns. At times it reminds me a little of Yes (musically, not vocally).

Alone
Here we get another high energy progressive rock tune. This is one with a wide range and scope. As great as the music is, though, the vocals are the real selling point here. They are among the best of the whole set.


Disc 2

Did I Request Thee? (Spoken)
And, via truth in advertising, this is another spoken piece.

You Made Me
Piano starts things here. It grows out into another progressive rock powerhouse. This is one of the real masterpieces of the set. I love the lyrics and the vocals. Yet, the music is strong enough to never need to feel second to those. This is one of the best here.

Letter from Home
This is just a short little instrumental that has a real European flair to it.

Fool's Gold
Here is another melodic prog powerhouse. It’s a complex and evocative piece with great music, lyrics and vocals.

Back to Meet My Maker
Although this isn’t a big variant of any kind, it is another stellar prog rock number.

Shadow to Shadow
This is a powerful ballad. It’s packed with emotion. I love the pairing of regular vocals with weird, whispered ones.

Wedding Night
This smoking hot piece borders on metal. It’s still very much progressive rock, but the emphasis is on the “rock” part of the equation.

The Promise
Theatrical and yet quite prog rock oriented, this is another strong piece on a disc with no weak material.

The Sweetest Part of Me
This is more or less a ballad. It’s an emotional one at that.

Murdering Elizabeth
Soaring, nearly metallic guitar is the concept here. This crunchy instrumental is in the vein of Joe Satriani or Steve Vai. .

Into the White
Electronic and theatrical, this is atmospheric for more than the first three minutes. It gets more oomph added to the mix after that, but even so it’s only a little. The extensive instrumental section is dominated by keyboard soloing.

Spark Redux
This starts with a rather ballad-like approach. It’s sad and a little creepy. It gets into more intense theatrical territory at the end.

Into the Cold
A powerful progressive rock piece, this one lands closer to metal than just about anything here.

Falling Into the Sky
This is another killer prog tune. It’s epic in scope in a lot of ways. The vocals convey a lot of emotion. I love the multiple layers of vocals.

The Living Proof, Pt. 2
More like a progressive rock ballad, this song really ties the whole thing together well. It has a great message and is musical a fitting closer.
REVIEW OF "SHADOW TO SHADOW, DEAN MADONIA'S FRANKENSTEIN" (In Spanish)



Dean Madonia publica un nuevo trabajo, quizá el más ambicioso, basado en la novela de Mary Shelley, Frankenstein o el Moderno Prometeo, desde una nueva perspectiva. En esta ocasión, Frankenstein todavía vive después de 200 años y relata su historia a un investigador genético que está a punto de desarrollar el primer humano clonado.
Efectivamente, estamos ante un disco conceptual al antiguo uso, con partes muy diferenciadas pero siguiendo un hilo narrativo conductor que crea un sólido argumento musical y lírico, con una música exquisita y de gran calidad sustentada por complejos arreglos y ejecuciones instrumentales y vocales, generando un artefacto casi teatral. En definitiva, este extraordinario trabajo de Dean es una ópera rock, puramente progresiva y sinfónica, llena de matices y esencias que recrean las posibilidades novelísticas desde un punto de vista totalmente musical.
Sería poco acertado por mi parte intentar definir una música de esta grandísima calidad comparándola con los homenajes a los que rinde pleitesía este genio norteamericano (desde Alan Parsons Project a ELP, pasando por Kansas, Styx, Pink Floyd o Genesis), puesto que el resultado final es un artefacto totalmente original y de gran inspiración y en ningún momento existe copia a los clásicos, sino una exquisita y emotiva rendición a un género progresivo pleno de posibilidades expositivas. Y en este aspecto, Dean se nos muestra como uno de los adalides de un rock exquisito, hecho con inteligencia y gran pasión, en el que el propio artista nos transmite sus inquietudes sociales e intelectuales a través de un medio que domina a la perfección: la música.
Una música caracterizada por elementos melódicos y dinámicos a partes iguales, con interludios, que preparan las exposiciones musicales que determinan estados anímicos y sensaciones, que sirven de guía para el propósito narrativo de este extraordinario disco conceptual integrado por enormes exposiciones sonoras que no son sino una excusa, bendita excusa, para plantear un rock progresivo de altísima calidad y grandísima emoción, no exenta de un alto grado técnico, sin el que no habría posibilidad del verdadero goce espiritual y musical que representa la audición de esta novela musical.
Sentimiento, mensaje, inteligencia y corazón son las directrices por las que transcurre a la perfección esta muestra progresiva, insisto, de enorme calidad, que nos presenta a un músico y a un grupo en su punto álgido de inspiración.
Su fluidez y el enorme sentimiento expuesto hacen de este disco uno de los inolvidables del género y uno de los clásicos del futuro del estilo progresivo, sin lugar a dudas. Estamos ante uno de los llamados a escribir con letras de oro su nombre en la extraordinaria Biblia progresiva de todos los tiempos. Uno de mis favoritos y, seguramente, uno de los vuestros después de escucharlo con detenimiento para desembocar en una de las mayores satisfacciones auditivas desde hace mucho tiempo. Recomendado por su honestidad y su empeño expresivo. Por su gran corazón y por su extraordinario sentimiento.
by Freddie Watson

You get the feeling that Dean Madonia is going to achieve his goal of creating a rock opera for Halloween that will rival Christmas’ TRANS-SIBERIAN ORCHESTRA. He’s being methodical and working within his means; this year he’s performing two concerts of his rock opera SHADOW TO SHADOW: DEAN MADONIA’S FRANKENSTEIN in Nashville.

In Dean’s FRANKENSTEIN, Dean Madonia’s Frankenstein shows that “The Monster” is still alive after over 200 years, and telling his cautionary tale to a genetic researcher about to make the first human clone. Recently MUSIC NEWS NASHVILLE caught up with Dean at his home in Music City.

Growing up, were there ever inklings that you would become this obsessed with a project of this magnitude? Did you believe you’d finish this project?


Yes! When I was quite young I saw Disney’s “Fantasia,” with my parents. At the time, I was blown away by what I felt was a perfect fusion of music and art. Since that day I have wanted to create something amazing on that grand of a scale. My original plan was to compose music (not necessarily classical) and art that followed a story. When I started “Shadow To Shadow,” I thought of it as a fun diversion and something that might bring that old dream to fruition. I even bought a light table so I could experiment with animation. I am nothing if not ambitious… I have released many albums so I thought it would be easy.

Silly rabbit! When STS took over my life for four years, I realized that I had taken a very big bite. I was asking a lot from the muse, my family, the band and myself. I worked on this in my “spare” time while still playing 3 – 4 out-of-town gigs a week. This schedule ran me down so badly that I had to get a personal trainer for awhile, just to get myself in better shape to handle the strain…

During the editing and mixing, I began to worry that I might die and leave it unfinished (like the epic Kevin Gilbert CD, “The Shaming Of the True”). In fact, STS was supposed to be released along with a companion graphic novel, so in a sense, this project has NOT been completed, but I am still working on the novel.

You say you want to get this to be the next TSO; this Halloween you’ll be doing two shows in Nashville. What do you think you’ll be getting from those shows?>/B>
I had planned a big show for Halloween back in 2012 at The Darkhorse Theater. I had dancers, original video that would be projected during the show, a small choir and string section ready to go and I planned to record video and the live audio as well.

Unfortunately, the mixes I had sent out for the CD were not ready so I wouldn’t have had any product at the show. While I waited for the mixes, I realized that I probably needed to write a few more songs to finish telling the story. At that point I cancelled the show. I was very upset about it at the time but I can see now that it was the right thing to do. I decided to try to just take my time and finish the album first and see how people like it and if there is any interest in the songs and in me playing them live.

The CD is better for it and I realize now that if I do a show of that size, even once, I will need a backer to pull it off the way I feel I need to. These stripped-down Nashville shows are baby steps, hopefully leading towards bigger shows and eventually my “Big Show.”

Your version of Frankenstein has the Monster communicating a cautionary tale to man against messing with DNA. What do you supposed helped the Monster become a great communicator?
In the Mary Shelley novel, the monster learns to speak words while spying on the “cottagers,” a family who lives in the building attached to the “low hovel’ where the monster hides. He makes the connection between the sounds they make when communicating and the sounds they make when reading to the old blind man who lives there. When a foreigner conveniently comes to stay with the family, he learns, “…the science of letters,” as they teach her from the book, “Ruins of Empires,” by Volney.

Another Deus Ex Machina in the plot occurs when the monster coincidentally finds a satchel of books including Milton’s “Paradise Lost,” a volume of Plutarch’s “Lives,” and the Johan Wolfgang von Goeth’s, “Sorrows of Werter.”

Now in my version, the monster still lives after over 200 years. I personally read at least 1 book per week. If the monster were to read as much as me, he would be well over 10,000 books by now. That would produce a very well-read and articulate monster!

What does SHADOW TO SHADOW mean?
The Monster must always remain in hiding, his countenance is hideous and bright light is not his friend. He lives in the cracks and shadows of society.

Describe the whole Dean Madonia’s FRANKENSTEIN empire.
“Shadow To Shadow, Dean Madonia’s Frankenstein,” is a 29 track CD, an upcoming graphic novel of the same name and hopefully, someday, a multi-media road-show similar to a Halloween season TSO type show or the maybe the recent “War Of the Worlds,” tour… You know – world domination…

For more, visit deanmadonia.com
I'm a sucker for a great concept album, especially one with a horror theme. The moment "Shadow to Shadow: Dean Madonia's Frankenstein" crossed my desk, I couldn't wait to hear it.

I'll admit I knew absolutely nothing about Dean Madonia prior to listening to this CD and I didn't know what to expect. Would "Shadow to Shadow" be a classic rock showcase like The Who's "Tommy?" Would it be more of a sinister rock chapter book like Alice Cooper's "Welcome to My Nightmare?" An avant garde rock opera along the lines of Pink Floyd's "The Wall?" Or maybe more in the vein of a Broadway musical, like Andrew Lloyd Webber's "The Phantom of the Opera?" I had no idea.

Interestingly enough, "Shadow to Shadow" is probably more akin to The Alan Parsons Project's "Tales of Mystery and Imagination" than any of the other recordings listed above. It's heavy on keyboard and piano and is buoyed by impressive production and songwriting. It focuses strongly on the story here, keeping faithful to the classic Mary Shelley novel (at least as far as I can remember; it's been at least ten years since I last read it) and adding a modern angle as well. As you listen to this terrific two CD set, the story unfolds in your mind, much like a classic radio mystery set to music, and it's easy to visualize the individual characters and settings.

The music, for the most part, is slow- to medium-paced and vocal driven. Although there are some hard rock moments, most of "Shadow to Shadow" is softer, striving to tell a story rather than to put a boot to your rock'n'roll ass. It works just fine as is but I would have preferred perhaps just a little more variety in style.

Madonia and crew are experienced musicians and their expertise shines through every track here. I would recommend listening to the two CDs here in one sitting, using a nice pair of headphones and with a lyric sheet in front of you. I can't imagine a better way to experience this particular re-telling of a legendary horror classic.

For more information, check out https://www.facebook.com/shadowtoshadow.
REVIEW OF "SHADOW TO SHADOW, DEAN MADONIA'S FRANKENSTEIN" (In Italian)

A prescindere da ciò che penso dell'album, un complimento a Dean Madonia è d'obbligo. Realizzare un’opera rock mi è sempre sembrato un lavoro titanico, qualcosa da pianificare con largo anticipo e da curare in tutti gli aspetti, soprattutto nella perfetta integrazione tra musica e liriche. Questo, ovviamente, dando per scontato che si parli di un’opera rock di qualità. Un progetto basato sulla figura di Frankenstein non è certo originale (tanto per fare un esempio che ci riguarda, il cantautore Enrico Ruggeri ha pubblicato proprio quest'anno un lavoro simile), ma Dean Madonia si è almeno dato da fare per rivedere la storia e aggiornarla, non basandosi unicamente sul testo di Mary Shelley ma trasferendolo duecento anni nel futuro e inserendo riferimenti all'ingegneria genetica. Uno sforzo forse minimo o banale, ma che renderà felici coloro che sono interessati al racconto, oltre che alla musica.
Dean Madonia ha iniziato ad occuparsi di musica sin da bambino, arrivando poi a collaborare con svariate band per finire con realizzare le proprie produzioni, che nel corso degli anni hanno spaziato dal country, al rock, al pop, al progressive, oltre ad essersi occupato di musiche per film. Tutta questa versatilità ed esperienza (forte di otto precedenti album) è stata senza dubbio fondamentale nella realizzazione di "Shadow to shadow", che si presenta in maniera curatissima sotto il profilo musicale, nella produzione e nella registrazione. La musica è un progressive dalle forti tinte pop e rock, con una struttura delle composizioni incentrata sulla forma canzone. Non sono presenti quindi complesse trame strumentali, variazioni ritmiche, assoli stratosferici, commistioni di genere, e altre "amenità" progressive, perché l'intera trama musicale è focalizzata a raccontare la storia, con un risultato che scorre via fluido in entrambi i cd di cui è composto il lavoro. Le canzoni sono ben scritte e tutte basate su giri armonici semplici ma efficaci, guidate sovente da una chitarra acustica che accompagna la voce dello stesso Madonia, gradevole ed adeguata al contesto. L'autore ha preferito concentrarsi sulla costruzione di strofe e ritornelli, più che privilegiare arrangiamenti elaborati. Questi sono comunque ben realizzati, mantenendosi scarni nelle ballate e arricchendosi nei brani più rock. In generale, si percepisce lo sforzo fatto per mantenere equilibrio e omogeneità, tanto che è difficile identificare un brano guida o una traccia che spicca in maniera evidente. Di tanto in tanto spuntano intermezzi strumentali più elaborati dal netto sapore cinematografico, sparsi qua e là all'interno dei brani, quando non interamente elaborati e indipendenti, come nella cupa "Chimera", mentre è frequente una tendenza ad un hard rock melodico confinante con l'AOR. Il tutto ricamato sui suoni delle già menzionate chitarre acustiche, del pianoforte, da ben dosati e poco invadenti suoni di synth, dei cori, e della chitarra elettrica nei brani più frizzanti. Di tanto in tanto alcune linee melodiche diventano ricorrenti, accentuando l'impressione di omogeneità e l'intento di voler caratterizzare il lavoro in senso "operistico", come la tradizione del genere impone.
"Shadow to shadow" non è un album impegnativo. Si ascolta facilmente e con gusto, ma questo non significa che soffra di eccessiva banalità o semplicità. L'autore è inoltre riuscito abbastanza efficacemente a rendere la musica funzionale alla storia, caratterizzando la disperazione della creatura grazie all'atmosfera creata dalle canzoni. Dean Madonia merita senz'altro un ascolto, soprattutto se vi piacciono le opere rock o il progressive annacquato ma gradevole.
Un ultimo appunto di natura letteraria: Victor Frankenstein e il mostro sono ovviamente due persone diverse, contrariamente a quanto la maggior parte di coloro che non hanno mai letto il romanzo di Mary Shelley credono. Mi auguro che non sia necessario questo album per ribadirlo.
Dean Madonia has achieved recent success in the country market with the Tim Dugger single, "(I Called Her) Tennessee" (Curb Records) as well as two film placements: "Honor Is Ours" in the 2013 Threshold Entertainment film Foodfight! and the song, "Just Like Love," from his band Pretty Little Horses, in the movie, The Stream, in theaters in October 2013.
What He is most excited about right now is his newly finished project, Shadow To Shadow, Dean Madonia's Frankenstein, is a 29 track concept CD (or rock opera), based on Mary Shelley's famous novel, Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus. The storyline has been straightened out chronologically with new ideas added as bookends. In this version, the monster is still alive after over 200 years, telling his cautionary tale, to a genetic researcher who is about to make the first human clone. These are crazy times, and right now, a 200 year old, ugly, rejected monster who knows a thing or two about being an outcast, could probably give some good advice to a modern day Victor Frankenstein!
The writing began in airports, planes, hotel rooms and bandhouses from coast to coast, was recorded in Dean's home studio in Nashville, TN. It was inspired by concept CDs of the past: Pink Floyd's "Dark Side" or "The Wall," The Who's "Quadrophenia" or "Tommy," The Beatles' "Sgt. Pepper's," Queensryche's "Operation Mindcrime," Any Alan Parsons Project CD, Kevin Gilbert's amazing work, "The Shaming Of the True," Frank Zappa - "Joe's Garage," and Genesis' "The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway." If this project is indeed folly, Dean is in good company!
The "official" release date is set for Janurary 13, 2014, however the CD is available now on Amazon and iTunes.

TRACK LISTING
DISK ONE
Pale Student(spoken)
The Living Proof
Chimera
What I Believe
The Spark Of Life
Alive Anew
Frightful Fiend (spoken)
Running From the Moon
Trusted Friend
He Calls Me
When He Plays His Guitar
Let Me In
Wrong
Alone

DISK TWO
Did I Request Thee? (spoken)
You Made Me
Letters From Home
Fools Gold
Back To Meet My Maker
Shadow To Shadow
Wedding Night
The Promise
The Sweetest Part Of Me
Murdering Elizabeth
Into the White
Spark Redux
Into the Cold
Falling Into the Sky
The Living Proof

Members:
Dean Madonia - vocals, keys, guitar
Val Lupescu - guitars
Travis Vance - bass
Michael Walter - drums
- Drummer Cafe (Oct 2, 2013)

Articles

BRET MICHAELS AND JAY DEMARCUS SIT IN WITH DEAN MADONIA!

Bret, Jay make singing tour of Music Row bars
Poison lead singer Bret Michaels continues to hang out in Nashville and make country friends.

Bret and Jay DeMarcus from Rascal Flatts cruised up and down the new Music Row bars area Friday and Saturday nights. Bret and Jay crashed new piano bar Chitown and sang a few with pianists Dean Madonia and Jimmy Maddox.

Yes, Bret did Every Rose Has Its Thorn, and the ladies went wild. There was a crush of cell phone photography. Bret and Jay also did some covers of Doobie Brothers and Elton John songs.

Then, the dynamic duo headed to Tin Roof and did it all over again.

Bret is on the verge of a deal with new country indie label Lofton Creek Records, so I imagine he's trying to meet and collaborate with as many Nashville music makers as possible.
(Tennessean.com)
Sound Check
By Brian Hyman
Published on May 14, 1998
What you see is what you get when singer-songwriter Dean Madonia takes the stage. In faded jeans, a comfortable T-shirt, and old Nikes, Madonia and his pop-rock songs are as easygoing and fan-friendly as those of his major influences, Paul Simon and James Taylor. Like them, Madonia weaves personal experiences into songs about loss, rites of passage, and -- of course -- love. Sound old-fashioned? Maybe, but that doesn't bother Madonia.
"Everybody's so damn mad all the time," he says about today's popular bands. "I'm happy." So what's his advice to those perturbed young souls? "Life has a certain amount of suckage, so get used to it and stop bitching!"

Madonia's debut CD, Deep Sky, which will be released May 25, steers clear of the angry-young-man thing, mainly because Madonia isn't in that frame of mind. "I don't feel comfortable writing about what I don't feel comfortable about," he says. "I have to write about what I know."

Noteworthy tracks on Deep Sky include a moving, Elton John-esque, piano-and-strings song called "Without a Net," which is about a woman Madonia knew, loved, and tragically lost. "The Big Crunch (Stephen Says)," is a trippy ode to scientist and writer Stephen Hawking and the opinions expressed in his book A Brief History of Time.

The hard-working Madonia has many weekly solo gigs: Shenanigan's Sports Pub in Hollywood Wednesday and Thursday; Mulvaney's Irish Pub in West Palm Beach Friday; and Tuna's Waterfront Grill in Miami Saturday. But he also performs with the newly formed Dean Madonia Band, which includes Cory Mauro on bass, Scott Tryon on drums, Jimmy Ruccolo on guitar, and Michael Waxman on keyboards.

The group will compete in a Battle of the Bands contest at Chili Pepper this Sunday and perform at Madonia's CD-release party at the Poor House May 24. Both clubs are located in Fort Lauderdale.

For more information on Madonia, including where you can get his CD, Deep Sky, visit his Website at www.gate.net/ ~madonia/deep.htm. And when you see him at a local gig, ask him why fans and friends call him Underdog, or at least get ready to make a request; Madonia's list of covers contains 179 songs.
Playing songs in dark hole-in-the-wall bars for smatterings of drunks who'd just as soon listen to the second hand on their watches ticking.... Spending your days laboring over writing songs only to have bar proprietors tell you that you can't play originals.... Watching bar patrons search for the table furthest from the stage and speakers.... Glumly strumming Jimmy Buffett songs for tourists Music
Ear Infection
By Brendan Kelley

Published: Thursday, April 15, 1999

bent on getting their Floridian culture fix.... As romantic as the starving artist notion is, the reality of being a professional musician locally is a grim one, and making a living off of music is a trick that few musicians can (or want to) pull off.

Fort Lauderdale songwriter-performer Dean Madonia knows this dichotomy well. He spends five nights a week in Broward County bars, playing cover songs from his library of nearly 200 tracks, sneaking in the occasional original whenever possible. In the daytime Madonia works at home, composing and arranging the tracks that he records and plays with his band, the Dean Madonia Band. As an original artist, Madonia performs folky, narrative-style, adult-contemporary tunes that appeal to the middle-aged James Taylor/Sting crowd. But when he punches the clock, Madonia becomes Underdog, the alter ego who plays everything from Dave Matthews and Tonic covers to Simon and Garfunkel and Cat Stevens songs. Madonia smartly makes no pretensions about the artistic validity of the latter performances. "I don't consider the cover gigs a part of the music business -- that's the bar business," he says. "You're there to move booze."

Unfortunately in South Florida artists as a rule can't make a living by playing originals. Playing other bands' songs is a necessary evil if one is serious about quitting his or her day job. "I try to pay the bills that way," Madonia says with a grin, drinking iced tea at a downtown Fort Lauderdale bar on a recent Saturday afternoon. "It's really frustrating because a lot of people can't tell the difference between karaoke and a real band." Despite the dismal realities, Madonia retains his commitment to succeeding as an original artist, and spends up to ten hours a day working on his own songs. Last year brought a small but satisfying milestone to Madonia: the release of the first Dean Madonia CD, Deep Sky, on his self-started Soft Monkey Music label.

Madonia is currently working on an ambitious project -- a show this Friday at Miami's Bayside Hard Rock Cafe, with beer-equipped coach buses chartered to take fans from Shenanigans Sports Pub in Hollywood to the show in Miami. The event is somewhat of a Catch-22: Madonia is losing "a ton of money" on the project, but it will offer his fans, the majority of whom live in Broward County, a chance to see a first-rate showcase of the songs from the Deep Sky CD, complete with string section and previews of songs from the album Madonia is preparing to record. The Dean Madonia Band has played only one show with the viola and cello players who appear on Deep Sky, so the added texture and dimension will be a well-appreciated treat for fans.

Madonia's placid, introspective music doesn't exactly conjure images of beer-swilling, bus-partying revelers, a notion he acknowledges with a smile. "I know the record-buying public is, what, 13- to 20-year-olds? I don't really appeal to them," he says. "We're not for the 'everybody-get-fucked-up' crowd either. I think we appeal to a well-read, intelligent crowd that can recognize quality music and understand the occasional literary reference."

The bus gimmick is simply an attempt to get his audience to the show. Because Madonia's audience is based in Broward, they're not likely to drive a long distance for a show they could catch near home. "If you don't invite people, they won't come," Madonia says. "You can't make it difficult for them."

Madonia's learned those lessons through experience, having played in several bands spanning several musical genres over the last decade. He tells a horror story of being invited to play a charity event at a Bloomingdales in West Palm Beach. The organizers told Madonia and his band that the event attracted an audience of 10,000 the previous year, but Madonia and crew took the stage to a sparse and unappreciative crowd of shoppers and Bloomingdales employees. "It was all old people," he laughs. "It was like Dawn of the Dead. All these old folks and employees were complaining about the volume, and we were playing really quietly and laughing about it while we played. There were absolutely no fans there."

So Madonia takes the bull by the horns these days, inviting fans to his gigs via the band's mailing list and Website, which is http://www.gate.net/~madonia/deep.htm. He and the band are preparing to hit the studio again in the coming months, and Madonia continues filling his hours working on demos for the new record, when he's not playing cover gigs, that is. As Underdog (his solo cover act) and with the Underdog Show (backed by his cover band) Madonia will continue to fill his evenings playing to slumped-over drunks and culture-seeking tourists. Just don't ask to hear Jimmy Buffett -- unless you meet the requirements.

"I have a policy about Buffett songs," Madonia says. "You've gotta have $20 and an out-of-state driver's license. Then I'll do one song."

The Dean Madonia Band plays April 16, at the Hard Rock Cafe, 401 Biscayne Blvd., Miami. Admission is free. Showtime is 11 p.m. Call 954-467-2524 for more information.

Last week Ear Infection mistakenly printed that the Swarm shows at Elwood's in Delray Beach occur every other Tuesday. The Swarm series actually takes place every other Wednesday, and the the next show features Whirlaway and dot Fash Wednesday, April 28th, at 9 p.m. Elwood's is located at 301 E. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach. For information, call 561-276-6635.

-- Brendan Kelley

Send music news, gossip, love letters, and witty commentary to Ear Infection at P.O. Box 14128, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33302. Or by e-mail: Brendan_Kelley@newtimesbpb.com
Dean Madonia
members: Dean Madonia (vocals, guitar, keyboards).
comments: After saturating the market with original live music for a few years, Madonia is taking a brief hiatus from performing and preparing the followup to his debut CD, the progressive Deep Sky. Madonia says the new CD will “still have a progressive influence but will be more commercial, more radio-friendly in terms of the production.” Deep Sky sold about 1,500 copies and attracted curious attention overseas, where DJs in Russia made it a favorite. Deep Sky also found a fan base in Ireland, Germany, Latvia and on MP3.com, where Madonia is seeing about 100 downloads per month. His Web site is www.gate.net/~madonia/deep.htm.
contact: 954/467-2524 or madonia@gate.net.
Hard Sell At Hard Rock For Dean Madonia
SEAN PICCOLI MUSIC WRITER
April 16, 1999|By SEAN PICCOLI MUSIC WRITER

It's not the fault of a few hard-working local musicians that they picked this weekend, of all weekends, to put on important shows. The news that hip-hop superstar Wyclef Jean would be staging his third annual Carnival benefit concert this Saturday in Miami only surfaced a couple of weeks ago. Local com-mitments already had been made when this competing diversion landed on our calendar with an anvil-weight thud.

And it's easier nowadays for big-ticket organizers to spring a one-off festival on a particular market -- with zip for notice -- than it is for local artists to back out of conflicting dates. So if you're not going to Carnival '99 on Saturday or to any pre-Carnival events, there are some home-grown alternatives.

Start with the Dean Madonia Band -- please. This weekend could be life or death, avocationally speaking, for bandleader Dean Madonia. His group throws a free concert tonight at the Hard Rock Cafe in Miami, and with enough pricey fanfare to underwrite a disaster movie.

Subsidizing attendance is just one of several gestures in support of what Madonia calls "the biggest show we've ever done."

He is bringing along a three-man video crew to document the concert and a 32-track digital sound console to record every note. Because that many cameras and microphones need something else to point at, Madonia is chartering a pair of buses to shuttle fans to the Hard Rock. Passengers are promised free beer and prizes en route.

The concert itself will feature three string players from a local philharmonic orchestra, sitting in with the band. Madonia's new percussion player, a recent arrival from Brazil, makes his debut that night. The buzz-baiting doesn't stop there: Madonia and his entertainment lawyer are inviting journalists and assorted music-industry heavies to check out the performance.

In other words, it's going to be a really huge night whether anybody shows up or not.

This is what it takes, apparently, for an unsigned local band to make a dent. Madonia does have some commercial sponsors lined up to help defray costs. But it's clear that he, like most musicians, doesn't have the resources to be leasing Friday-night floor space at the Hard Rock on a regular basis.

So lend a hand, live music fans. Get on the bus! Help make this high-wire stunt a success, so Madonia can have a whack at stardom, and maybe start charging his audiences down the road.

The bus fleet sails this evening from Shenanigans nightclub, 3303 Sheridan St., Hollywood, site of the band's pre-party. Call 954-981-9702 for details. The Hard Rock Cafe is at 401 N. Biscayne Blvd., Miami, 305-377-3110.

Also this weekend, South Florida groove zealots the Baboons are throwing a CD release party on Saturday night at Tobacco Road, 626 S. Miami Ave., Miami, 305-374-1198. The album, Evolution, is the band's first. The concert is most certainly not. Doors open to the public at 10 p.m. For more information, drop the band an e-mail at thebaboons@hotmail.com.

Sean Piccoli can be reached at spiccoli@sun-sentinel.com or 954-356-4832.
Sing us a song, piano man
Nashville pianist plays The Penguin

PHOTO COURTESY OF JONNO DEILY-SWEARINGEN
Dueling piano player Dean Madonia lost part of his ring finger in a lawnmower accident in 2004, but his missing digit hasn’t kept him from tickling the ivories. Madonia spends his weekends trekking across the country to perform well-loved classics and original tunes.


BY KELSEY WHIPPLE
MARCH 19, 2009 | 12:00 A.M. CST
Sooner or later, every musician has to decide whether or not he or she has made it. So far, Dean Madonia hasn’t.
As he explains: “I always thought the fat guy with the scar was going to come up and go, ‘Hey, kid, you’re great, Sign this, and you’re going to be famous.’” Although it’s clear where the anecdote is headed, disappointment is noticeably absent from his voice. “But that didn’t happen. It’s kind of weird playing the dueling pianos when you thought you were going to be the next Elvis or The Beatles.”
Madonia’s life, one spent as a dueling piano player in cities on and between both coasts, is the perfect opportunity for a rocky road metaphor, but he won’t let you use it. As he plays the Yamaha grand over the phone in his Nashville home, Madonia doesn’t waste his memories. Instead, he recycles them, building on each one to complete an engaging version of his life story so far.
“My parents got divorced when I was 9, so my piano lessons came to a pretty complete halt,” Madonia says. His father moved to California and left his piano to Madonia in Michigan. “I guess that was kind of like my tie to my father, so I just kept playing.”
Although the lessons stopped, Madonia did not, and the results of the 38 years that have passed are best expressed in numbers: four solo albums, around 40 bands, one record label and a 3-year-old son. Along the way, Madonia has also gained a second home.
“I’ve played there so many times, I feel like I know Columbia better than Nashville,” Madonia says. “I’ve already turned over a whole graduating class, at least. ... Whenever I see people there, they’ll say, ‘Hey, I haven’t seen you in a long time,’ and I have to be like, ‘Dude, I don’t live here.’”
Madonia’s voice is as deliberate as his story is romantic. It never falters but is tested as he describes his lastest setback.
Almost five years ago, while struggling with heat stroke and an unyielding lawnmower in his front yard, an accident cost Madonia part of his right ring finger and the tip of his pinky.
“Sometimes I look down at it, and I’m like, ‘God, that was really, really dumb,’” Madonia says, and it’s easy to imagine he’s doing so as he speaks — until he laughs. For a while, he thought his career was over. “I don’t believe that the universe is trying to tell me something or anything,” he says. “But I think that when things happen, you have to draw the lessons you can from them. ... I probably play almost as well as I ever played.” He pauses. “Maybe better.”
If Madonia had a least important finger, it was the one he lost. “I have to focus on the positive aspect because if you focus on the negative side in something like this, that’s what sends you down the big spiral,” he says.
Fellow dueling pianist Brad Heron, who calls “nine-fingered Dean” one of the top duelers around, says he’s “about the best there is on Meatloaf’s ‘Paradise by the Dashboard Lights.’” Heron admires Madonia’s humility. “If I only had nine fingers and I played as good as he did, I’d be telling everyone I know,” he says.
Today, Madonia has learned to play smarter, and he focuses on his son, Wolfgang, and his original music on the four days a week he sets aside from trips. Eventually, he’d like to play his own music. Madonia’s original composition “Honor Is Ours” will be featured in the animated movie Foodfight!, starring Charlie Sheen and the Duff sisters, this summer.
“When I first met Dean, I realized he was more of a professional musician than just a dueling piano player,” says Keith Daly, general manager of The Penguin Piano Bar where Madonia has played countless times. Daly says Madonia isn’t a showman and doesn’t rely on gimmicks. “Early in the night or on Thursday nights when we’re not busy, he’ll play some of his original music for the staff and me, and it’s really good.”
At 47, Madonia is still firmly focused on a songwriting career and constantly has a smattering of projects in the works. No, he hasn’t made it — but he’d like to add “yet” to the end of that sentence.
“It’s not the story everybody wants to hear about the dueling pianos,” Madonia says, “but it’s my story.”

Event Info
Who: Dean Madonia
When: March 19, 20, 21
Where: The Penguin Piano Bar
Cost: 3/19 – Free; 3/20 – Free for women, $5 for men; 3/21 – $5 
Call: 449-8005
Friday, 10 September 2010 00:00
A Great Night of Music at NSAI’s Radio Show!!
Written by David W Edwards
James Breedwell of the Nashville Music Group hosted the NSAI Radio Show at Hotel Indigo on Sunday, August 29th, 2010. It was a great night of music with a variety of talented songwriters on hand. There was especially a buzz in the air with hit songwriter Monty Powell on the scene to perform with his daughter Rebeka Powell. Monty has written many hit songs for Keith Urban, Diamond Rio, Chris Cagle, and many other artists over the years. He is Keith Urban’s right hand man when it comes to writing hits. Check out his website www.montypowell.com!! You will be amazed at the sheer amount of cuts and hits he has had.

The whole evening was not only about great music but a celebration of what NSAI (Nashville Songwriters Association International) does to help songwriters. Through workshops, Pitch a Song to a Publisher Nights, song critiquing, and many other events throughout the year, NSAI is a great place for a new songwriter to start when entering the world of songwriting. They have helped so many songwriters over the years realize their dreams of becoming professional songwriters. Check out their website at www.nashvillesongwriters.com. You can listen to the broadcast of this monthly program on www.wbrn.fm.

As usual James Breedwell did a wonderful job hosting the evening with songwriter Dean Madonia helping to introduce the acts. Pat of the Nashville Music Group was on hand to keep everything going smoothly and organized as always.

The night started out with a performance by Rebeka Powell, the daughter of jazz singer Anna Wilson and hit song maker Monty Powell. She was accompanied by Monty on acoustic guitar and performed an amazing set. This girl has it all with her beautiful voice and a natural ability to write songs which she obviously inherited from her father and mother. After her performance, I had a chance to talk to Monty and of course he was very proud of his daughter. “She is the complete package with her voice and songwriting skills” said Monty. He commented that he wished he would have been at her level of songwriting when he was 20 years old and jokingly said that he could have already been retired. Of course, we will continue to see Monty at the top of the charts and it won’t be long before Rebeka is riding high on the charts herself. Check Rebeka out at www.facebook.com/rebekahp.

David G. Smith was next up and did a great job with several clever songs including “Her Body Won’t Lie” and a song called “Ageless”. David co-writes with several different songwriters around town. Check out David G. Smith at www.myspace.com/davidgsmithmusic.

The night continued with Bruce Miller performing next! He sang a great song called “Miracles”. It was about a young man who died just after turning 18 years old. The day after he died a white lily popped up in the back yard at his Mom and Dad’s house. This type of flower never grew in the area because of the soil and climate. They took it as a sign that it was their son sending them a message. The next day 5 more white lilies appeared surrounding the first white lily. That same day they got a call telling them that by their son donating his organs he had saved 5 individuals life’s. Wow, what a story and what a song! James interviewed Bruce afterwards and asked him what his favorite song was that he had ever written. A true songwriter, Bruce replied “the last one he wrote”. He said he loved new songs because they are kind of like a new girlfriend “new and exciting”. He then joked that it didn’t really apply to him though, he was married. He also gave advise to the audience to not let anyone try to change who you are or what your style of music is, just be yourself. Check out Bruce Miller at www.brucemichaelmiller.com.

Next up was Dean Madonia who doubled as co-host of the evening’s festivities. Dean is an awesome musician and a very talented songwriter. Dean entertained the crowd with an amazing set. He has been playing the piano since he was 8 years old and has been playing the guitar since the age of 13. He has played with several Nashville acts. Be sure to catch him live if you get the chance, it is worth the effort to go see him. Check out Dean at www.deanmadonia.com.

The night continued with a trio of talented ladies that included Sherri Gough, Roxy Randle, and Anne DeChant. Sherri Gough had a great set with songs including Jesus and a fun song called Hot Coal. She gave some great advise that Jeffrey Steele had given her. “You can’t hear what you can’t see. You have to be out there playing and letting people hear you”. Check out Sherri had www.myspace.com/sherrigough.



Next up was the very entertaining Roxy Randle. Not only a great entertainer but her quirky personality got her set off to a bang when she moved the recorder used for the radio program during her introduction. She is a fun performer, great songwriter, and has a wonderful voice to match. Check her out at www.myspace.com/roxierandle. The last of the super trio was Anne DeChant. This veteran songwriter and performer has performed at the Lilith Fair, the White House, and has opened for Nora Jones, Train, Vonda Shepard, and Stevie Nicks to name just a few artists. Her high energy set was rare for a songwriter’s night. She stood throughout the set and occasionally would kick her leg up in rock and roll fashion. She sang an excellent song called Running Red Lights. She was a little under the weather and still did an amazing job!! Check her out at www.anneedechant.com and www.myspace.com/anneedechant.






Now for me one of the highlights of the night was catching Canadian singer/songwriter Declan McGarry. He started out the set with a awesome song called Summer Heat. It had catchy lyrics such as “I could have kissed you but I was smiling too much”. Declan can flat out jam and he has a great stage presence also. He sang a song called Headlights Glow which was one of the best songs of the night. It had a bit of a Steve Earle feel to it and was just an awesome song. Expect to hear big things in the future from Declan McGarry. Check him out at www.myspace.com/declanmcgarry , www.facebook.com/declanmcgarry, and www.declanmcgarry.com.

The night concluded with James Breedwell playing a few tunes. As always James’ tender voice and amazing lyrics were right on to end the evening on a high note. The night was a major success and a great tribute to what NSAI does for songwriters everywhere. Keep up the great job James and NSAI. Be sure to check James Breedwell and the Nashville Music Group out at www.myspace.com/jamesbreedwell.
Keep up the great job James and Pat!! For membership information for the NSAI go to www.nashvillesongwriters.com.
NSAI SUCCESS STORY

Before I moved my family to Nashville in 2002, I read about and immediately joined NSAI and started to attend song camps and workshops. Flying out of town every Thursday through Sunday left me little time for my family and zero time for networking, so instead I focused on writing the best songs I could - while staying in touch with and writing with many of my fellow campers.

What has kept me going all this time is the belief that a good song will find it's way to the right people. There is NO DOUBT IN MY MIND that NSAI staff members, evaluators, one-on-one mentoring, seminars, workshops and song camps gave me the tools I needed to refine my craft and write my catalog of songs. Not many have heard these songs outside my immediate circle and the staff at NSAI, I hope "(I Called Her) Tennessee," is going to change all of that!


I met engineer/producer Kelly Schoenfeld of Daredevilproduction.com through a mutual friend, (it's always someone you know). Kelly knew that I had been writing with the band "Heartland) and asked me if I wanted to write with an artist from Alabama that he was producing. I always say yes, which is both a blessing and a curse to me (time management issues).

Kelly showed up at my studio with Tim and his dad and left us alone for a few hours, we talked for awhile and really hit it off. Tim has been playing in bars with his band since he was 14 and was still performing somewhere every week, (reminded me of myself at that age), I was impressed with his talent, dedication and maturity.

Tim wanted to write a song about spring break. I had lived and performed in Fort Lauderdale, FL for 20 years, so I know everything about spring break. We just started writing a song about this high school boy who meets a girl sitting on a UT blanket. We didn't have a hook... Tim threw out the line with "... a thing or three." My mom always uses that expression, but We're from MI, so I wasn't sure... He told me that his dad says that all the time, so that was good enough for me. Then all of a sudden it hit me - "I never knew her name, so I called her Tennessee." We knew the song was solid, but that gave it the extra something - Tim looked at me and grinned - we both knew we had something.

Tim cut that song and released it on his indy CD "Getting There." When Curb singed him four years later, they took the song and the tracks that Kelly produced, and now it's Tim's new single! I have been writing with and for Kelly and his partner Johnny Dwinell and their artists for 4 years now, and I hope that this single charts, and Daredevil really takes off!
Dean Madonia - NSAI (Oct 1, 2012)

Podcasts

Wyscan (Third Wish)

WYSCAN Third Wish 9 song CD
Recorded at Heavy Air Studio (Miami)
****


One of the attributes of a real musician is the ability to know when to hold back on an obvious musical set-up--knowing when to apply the subtle, quick riff or laidback, textured background fill while other inexperienced musicians pummel their listeners with lunkheaded solos or freeze-dried melodies. Formerly called "Third Wish," the band was forced to change their name for legal reasons to Wyscan. This quintet is an accomplished progressive metal act that ascends a few steps beyond the heavy posturing ofbetter-known groups like "Dream Theatre" by witholding their technical virtuosity until the right moment. While guitarist Jonathan Kreisberg and keyboardist John Roggie both have plentiful chops, "Third Wish" is filled with little bursts of energetic playing and exciting accents rather than the bombastic overload favored by most groups in the genre.

As a by-product, "Third Wish" should appeal to hard rock listeners searching for new directions - those curious folks initially put off by all of the complex chord changes and quick change-up rhythyms that only music students seem to fathom. Even though Wyscan can conjure some mellow moments (especially on the ballad "The Wanting," with vocalist Dean Madonia sounding like a ringer for Billy Ocean), the emphasis here is on inventive construction (the songs often sound like a cross between Be Bop Deluxe and King Crimson) with some underlying fusion moves. While there are a lot of thoughtful passages, it never sounds too brainy, nor does it sound stuffed with a lot of arty pretense.

Contact: Batboy music, 3150 jackson Aveenue, Miami FL 33133 (305) 441-7020

Richard Pomplesch - Jam Magazine May 10, 1996 (May 10, 1997)
Sept 21-27 1994
Will They Get Their Third Wish?

A Miami Band that's an alternative to alternative by Bill meredith

Contrary to what MTV would have you believe, to see a band is not necessarily to hear a band. Look at Miami band Third Wish and you'd be tempted to think hard rock: Vocalist Dean Madonia looks like a heavy-metal screamer; guitarist Jonathan Kreisberg has the devilish grin of guitar hero Steve Vai. But while their long-haired appearance might invite catagorization, their sound defies it.
Third Wish harkensback to the lesser-publicized "progressive" movement that took place throughout the '70's - artists like Yes, Santanna and Jeff beck, whose complexities took them out of the standard rock mold. Third Wish blends these ideals, with a dash of fusion and some more modern elements, to create a '90's alternative to todays already oversaturated alternative scene.
Their sound contains a healthy dose of British fusion-guitar luminary Allan Holdsworth, traces of classical composer Claude Debussy, world and latin music, and elements of UK, the rock/fusion band that included Holdsworth and members of such hard-to-catagorize acts as Yes, King Crimson and Frank Zappa's Mothers of Invention. The Third Wish bio sheet likens their sound to rock, art rock, jazz, classical and alternative music.
"We're trying to capture that feeling of spontinaeity, with a psycadelic influence," says Kreisberg, echoing the jazz/fusion-meets-art rock side of the band. "We want to reach an artistically inclined audience."
When you look at the band's othe rmembers' resumes, it becomes obvious why Third Wish is hard to peg. Previous experience includes jazz (Kreisberg toured with the University of Miami Concert Jazz Band), fusion (Kreisberg and keyboardist John Roggie played with violist Debbie Spring; bassist Javier Carrion with Sha-Shaty) blues (drummer Vincent Verderame worked with Roach Thompson) and funk (Conehead Bop, Madonia's
Parliment/Funkidelic-style original act).
Third Wish, intact since late '92, has a self-titles 3 song debut cassette available at Y&T music in Miami, and
Peaches and Uncle Sam's in Miami and Fort Lauderdale. The band is currently completing a full-length CD, which will be available in early '95, at Carrion's home studio.
Their material, particularly in live performances, offers a barrage of shifting time signatures (including 3/4, 5/4, 7/4, and 9/8), Verderame's Terry Bozzio-ish drumming, Yes-like harmonies and an uncommon wall-of-sound
fullness.
This is due largely to the work of Roggie, whose textural keyboard playing lays the foundation for the band's
sound, and Kreisberg, whose tone so often resembles violin or keyboards that you wouldn't belive that he uses no guitar synthesizer equipment (he doesn't).
While the material on the Third Wish cassette is a good introduction to the band, a live show truly presents them
in their element, with newer material that hints at an even more diverse array of directions. The instrumental, "Song For Tracy" is a waltz-time number featuring a blazing solo by Kreisberg; "Trance" ("the one corporate America would like to keep you in," said Madonia in the song's introduction) is a Dixie Dregs-like funk groove which offers a high-octane bass solo by Carrion.
Modonia's vocals help keep Third Wish from being lumped into the pure-fusion category. Most high-energy
bands are fronted by upper-register shreikers, but Madonia's influences are more akin to Elton John and Billy Joel. His range is considerable, his delivery relaxed, and his love of fusion solidified him with the already-intact instrumental unit. "I've been trying all of my life to find players who even knew who UK was," he say.
With a cassette under their belt, a CD on the way, and some excellent previous experience, Third Wish realizes the next step is to create some publicity and move northward through Florida and beyond. While their superb musicianship could be a double-edged sword (Kreisberg say radio formats have turned the public away from musicallity and bred "lazy listeners"). they do have one major point in their favor; Despite the band's talent, the members' average age hovers around a lofty 25.
"I' like to do a southern tour and start moving up the coast," says Kreisberg, who adds, "I'd like to someday do
a live disc with this band"
"Even if we don't ever make it, if we just complete the CD..." says Madonia, his voice trailing off. Clearly this is a band that wants to accomplish more, but is happy with what they've alreadt created. Conquering the fickle public would be gravy.
And what deep dark secrets lie within the band's name? "It's about the99th one we came accoss," says
Kreisberg, laughing, But the third wish is the one you really think about."
Bill Meredith - XS Magazine Sept 21 - 27 1994 (Sep 21, 1997)
Third Wish, "Third Wish
(independent)

Seasoned musicians with a variety of influences are the key to the flow of Third Wish's sound. Flashes of jazz

and classical composition make up what the band calls rock-art-fusion."
This three song demo release is a preview of a CD to be released in the fall. The songs complimented by Dean

Madonia's strong vocals, have a sonic passion. Unusual percussion and electronic drums fill out the back beat,

especially on the track, "Back In the Womb."
Third Wish has landed some choice opening slots for Steve Vai and Yngwie Malmsteen, and has played a

Yamaha-sponsered showcase in Orlando.

- Sandra Carol Schulman (May 20, 1994)
Sandra Carol Schulman - Fort Lauderdale Sun Sentinel (May 20, 1997)
Third Wish Live
by Brian Eckert

Recently I had the chance to catch a live show by THIRD WISH, an original band from Miami. If you have not heard Third Wish yet it's probablyt because they're relatively new on the scene. They have only been together

since the fall of 1992 when the five of them joined together to develope a new and innovative approach to Rock music. Despite the fact that they have not been around very long, THIRD WISH still managed to be selected (from 200 Florida bands) as one of the five semi-finalists to perform in the Orlando showcase for the "Yamaha Sound Check" competition.
When you first get to hear THIRD WISH rip into one of their originals, you quickly learn thatthis is no average garage band. The band flawlessly shifts gears throough a variety of musical grooves and musical styles. THIRD WISH describe their music as "combining the energy of rock, the improvisational 'chance taking' of jazz and the orchestral soundscaping of classical music, complimented by lyrics which both confront and celebrate many aspects of our society." It is definately difficult to categorize the music of THIRD WISH since it obviously draws from such a variety of styles.
THIRD WISH is comprised of five gifted musicians who have all played in well-known groups in the South Florida area. The band is fronted by vocalist DEAN MADONIA who you may have seen in such groups as FX, the CITY LIMITS SECOND SHIFT BAND, or CONEHEAD BOP. Guitarist JONATHAN KREISBERG has performed with the DEBBIE SPRING GROUP and the University Of Miami Concert Jazz Band (who he recently
toured with in Brazil). Janathan has been featured in Guitar Player and Downbeat magazines. On keyboard is JOHN ROGGIE who also played with the DEBBIE SPRING GROUP as well as HUMANE SOCIETY, Rapper Raw B. Jae, and a number of other South Florida Groups. Laying down the low end of the group is bassist JAVIER
CARRION who was formerly with SHA-SHATY. Rounding out the band is drummer VINCE VERDERAME who has performed with Roach Thompson, Nil Lara, Lynne Nobel, and has also toured South America with Jose Lois Rodrigues, "El Puma."
Aside from great songwriting, THIRD WISH's strength lies in it's members who are all accomplished
musicians. All THIRD WISH's instrumentalists have studied at the University of Miami's nationally acclaimed
School of Music. (Two members, Jonathan and Javier are currently studying there... while John and Vince are UM gradusates).
These guys lay down a solid foundation on which DEAN MADONIA, trained as a visual artist, can create his passionate and colorful vocals.
THIRD WISH has yet to release a CD, butthey plan to get into the studio to record sometime in October. So your only chance to check them out is at one of their upcoming live dates: ROSEBUDS, Sept 24 (Live broadcast on WFTL; STEPHEN TALKHOUSE, Sept 26, PLUS FIVE, Oct 16.
If you would like to have your tape or CD reviewed in this column, have a gig schedule you'd like to mail in, have any comments or suggestions, or have anything else you'd like to see in this column send 'em my way
care of this magazine.

Brian Eckert is an electric bass player and vocalsit with a studio music and jazz degree from the University of Miami. Brian has performed and recorded with numerous local original bands and is currently performing in KRYPTON, the 8 piece house band at the DAILY PLANET in Ft. Lauderdale, FL.

Sept 11 1992
Brian Eckert - Verge Magazine (Miami) (Sep 11, 1997)
Music
Third of Paradise
This rock and roll Wish rings true
By Greg Baker

Published: Tuesday, August 16, 1994

Third Wish consists of serious musicians, veterans of the University of Miami's music school, true virtuosos capable of technical precision in a variety of genres. Even so, they're a damn good rock band.

If that seems unlikely -- that players who can run through a perfect Beethoven sonata are also able to rock da house -- the actual coalescence of Third Wish was an even longer shot, for no other reason than simple geography. Singer Dean Madonia lives in Fort Lauderdale. Guitarist and songwriter Jonathan Kreisberg calls South Miami home. Keyboardist John Roggie gets his mail on South Beach. Bass player Javier Carrion resides in West Kendall. And drummer Vince Verderame is a Coconut Grovite. "It does make it easy for us to flyer," quips Kreisberg.

Kreisberg and Roggie were working with cellist-violist Debbie Spring about two years ago when, Kreisberg says, they decided they wanted to try something "with more of an edge." Roggie, trained as a classical pianist, and Kreisberg, who toured Brazil as a member of the UM Concert Jazz Band, hooked up a few months later with Verderame, who was studying classical percussion at UM. Carrion, who's still completing the jazz program, came onboard next, and Third Wish was officially a band. All they needed was a vocalist.

"Javier was playing in Sha-Shaty," Dean Madonia recalls, "and we met at a session. He told me he was in another band that was looking for a singer. I'm thinking, Yeah, you've got this band! There's no way I'm driving to Miami for this." Then Carrion played some four-track demos for Madonia. "They sounded great," the singer says. "I played keyboards in Conehead Bop, and I play some guitar, but I wouldn't play with these guys. They're just too good."

Instead, Madonia lends his expansive vocals to the sometimes intricate, sometimes ballsy configurations of the other four to fashion a sound that reflects elements of the kind of Seventies "progressive art rock" purveyed by Yes, early Rush, and early Genesis. But the Wish pulls this off without ever falling into the cheese barrel.

Even at their most languorous, as in "The Game," Third Wish slip in enough worthwhile lyrics and solo excursions to keep things interesting. None of their songs is riot-inducing, and the members of the band don't expect audiences to jump up and form a conga line. "This isn't supposed to be light-hearted party music," Kreisberg notes. Madonia adds, "Plus we don't put on this big attitude. We're not preaching."

The approach presents an obvious problem for the quintet. There are fans for this out there," Kreisberg says. "But they aren't the types who hang out in the clubs. They're more the closet music-heads." Tweeded pipe-suckers might give Third Wish straight A's, but the band wants to reach the rockers, and the music itself should be able to.

Except, of course, for the fact that most rock fans are not generally known as deep musical thinkers. There's the marvel factor -- watching Kreisberg whip out six-string runs as if he had 40 fingers, seeing exactly how Roggie fills all voids with multiple keyboards, and so on -- but to crawl deep into the Third Wish groove you have to have an interest in true and real musical ability of the recital kind.

Mostly. In "Back in the Womb," one of three songs on the group's debut cassette, ethereal keys mix with Madonia's semivocals ("push") to create something resembling human birth (a popular topic among good rock bands, including One and Nil Lara). And that's just the intro. After the little whorl, Carrion slams home some heavy, thumbed-bass detonations, and the band snaps their attention to some tough, old-style-rock progressions. "We take the edge of rock and roll and the complex harmonies of jazz," Verderame said on a recent television interview. "Unlike the fusion you hear on the radio, which takes the edge out of rock, takes the simpler harmonies of rock, and puts it in a jazz context."

Though theirs certainly is a fusion -- of jazz, rock, even classical -- Third Wish does not play fusion, as in the pap you hear on Love-94. Which is not to say their jazz-oriented tunes, such as "Paths," don't do justice to improv: Kreisberg plays this one extremely subtly, lightly stroking the strings, barely touching one to produce a "ding" hook, as Verderame gently taps a cymbal and Madonia's sprawling voice floats above it all like a kite on a lilting breeze.

"Paths," which isn't on the cassette but will appear on Third Wish's debut CD, due this fall, is one of several songs that allows Kreisberg to get off a guitar solo. During one live performance, you see drummer Verderame reach up and adjust a cymbal clamp in the middle of the song. He knows he has time, he knows what's coming: Kreisberg twisting out impossible stings from his strings, cross-handed fingering way up on the frets, for sonic effect not flash, squeezing sparks that are more tasteful, clean, and controlled than, say, those of Steve Vai or Yngwie Malmsteen (both for whom Third Wish has opened).

All the Wishers take solos, and each is a blessed event for the musically inclined (emphasis on music), but the fireworks are equally bright in collaboration. "Stars" lights up with Roggie's keys, then Kreisberg's guitar, then Carrion's bass A all of it building to a splashing drum burst by Verderame that signals Madonia's vocal insert, with Carrion both strumming and finger-plucking oversize bass lines. Then those vocals hush and rush right up to the bridge, at which point Madonia's voice flies out the window as another dazzling guitar break smashes in the front door. The song has arrived.

And rockers say, "Huh?" Band members explain they try to shape a setlist from their tons of originals that caters to rockers when they play for such audiences. But they don't argue that it wouldn't hurt headbangers to open their minds to something a little more complicated and intricate than "we will we will rock you." Not that "Trance," for example, doesn't rock you, with its massive drum patterns and roiling energy.

Even so, and perhaps because of those blistering guitar solos, Third Wish is more welcome at metal venues than jazz clubs or straightup rock joints. "We're trying to break out of the heavy-metal places," Kreisberg says. "We want to play more places that support funk, world-music type stuff. We improvise a lot, but it's more to let it blow. Cut loose. But it's still expressing a feeling."

That's really it: This is music you can feel, even if you don't know an F-sharp from an open-tuning. For all its intricacy and virtuosity, Third Wish's sound is atmospheric, absorbing. And, yes, it still rocks.

Third Wish performs tonight (Thursday) at Nocturnal Cafe (525-9656), tomorrow (Friday) at Rosebuds in Ft Lauderdale (566-6331), and Sunday at the Plus Two in West Palm Beach (407-965-4072). Call for times and prices.
WYSCAN Third Wish 9 song CD
Recorded at Heavy Air Studio (Miami)


One of the attributes of a real musician is the ability to know when to hold back on an obvious musical set-up--knowing when to apply the subtle, quick riff or laid back, textured background fill while other inexperienced musicians pummel their listeners with lunkheaded solos or freeze-dried melodies. Formerly called "Third Wish," the band was forced to change their name for legal reasons to Wyscan. This quintet is an accomplished progressive metal act that ascends a few steps beyond the heavy posturing of better-known groups like "Dream Theatre" by withholding their technical virtuosity until the right moment. While guitarist Jonathan Kreisberg and keyboardist Jon Roggie both have plentiful chops, "Third Wish" is filled with little bursts of energetic playing and exciting accents rather than the bombastic overload favored by most groups in the genre.

As a by-product, "Third Wish" should appeal to hard rock listeners searching for new directions - those curious folks initially put off by all of the complex chord changes and quick change-up rythyms that only music students seem to fathom. Even though Wyscan can conjure some mellow moments (especially on the ballad "The Wanting," with vocalist Dean Madonia sounding like a ringer for Billy Ocean), the emphasis here is on inventive construction (the songs often sound like a cross between Be Bop Deluxe and King Crimson) with some underlying fusion moves. While there are a lot of thoughtful passages, it never sounds too brainy, nor does it sound stuffed with a lot of arty pretense.

Contact: Batboy music, 3150 jackson Avenue, Miami FL 33133 (305) 441-7020

Bill Meredith - Sun Sentinel - Fort Lauderdale, FL (Monday, May 19)

Deep Sky Reviews

Midwestern Skies (Swedish e-zine at melodic.net), Review of Deep Sky DEAN MADONIA - "Deep Sky" (Soft Monkey Music, 1998) Well guys it's time to listen up again. Dean Madonia have done this years so far best indiependent release. This little pearl of plastic is filled with great modern singer songwriter material all produced in a great way! First out for example is the bloody great "The War Came Home To Me" and the piano and viola - based "Without A Net" contains some great lyrics and gets me to think of guys like Kevin Gilbert, david Sylvian and Bryan Ferry. Bloody good album and I just can recommend you all to take a closer look at this hidden treasure at http://gate.net/~madonia/deep.htm Do yourself a favor and surf to his place and buy a CD. Par Winberg
MTV local, June 9, 1998 Review of Deep Sky

" A Star For Our Generation"

Singer/songwriter DEAN MADONIA performed sans band on a recent Saturday at Tuna's, a waterfront bar and grill in North Miami Beach. Despite a rocky start, his solo performance went on without a hitch. His voice is a cross between the late SHANNON HOON of BLIND MELON and PEARL JAM'S EDDIE VEDDER. He performed "I'll Fall In Love Again" and "On The Way Home" from his CD Deep Sky on his own label, Soft Monkey Music Inc. At one point he actually left the stage to personally sing "Happy Birthday" to one lucky lady in the audience! Madonia also performed various cover tunes at the request of the audience. But don't call him Dean when he's performing someone else's material. His moniker is "Underdog" to his loyal fans and friends when he's covering other artists. He plays everything from HOOTIE AND THE BLOWFISH, WALLFLOWERS, TOAD THE WET SPROCKET and NIRVANA to INXS and THE CARS. Dean is very comfortable on stage; this is mostly due to his early beginnings in music. Both he and his father began to take piano lessons when Dean was only eight years old. Once his father worked regular gigs, he'd play during his dad's breaks. His musical repertoire also includes keyboards and guitar. As the writer of his own music and lyrics, Madonia's sound is directly related to his musical influences and personal taste. He says his lyrical influences were artists such as PAUL SIMON, BILLY JOEL, JONI MITCHELL and TORI AMOS. In his music, though, you can really hear undertones of JAMES TAYLOR, TONIC, and COLLECTIVE SOUL. His live performances are great and his album is even better, but if you can't catch him at one of his shows, you can hear him on Sundays during 94.9's "Zeta Goes Local" show, college radio station WVUM, "The Beast and Baker Show" on 790 AM as well as a few underground stations who shall remain nameless. The hardest working guy in the local scene, Dean plays several gigs weekly, performs with his band at local clubs, and recently competed in the "Baywatch Official Battle Of The Bands" as well as touring all over Florida in support of the new album. This talented guy won't be gigging for long. "I would like to get out of the bar business and get into the music business," he told me during one of his breaks. To find out more about DEAN MADONIA and his band, where they'll be performing and where to get the Deep Sky album, visit his website at www.gate.net/~madoniac/deep.html. -- Maxine Hinds MTV College Stringer feedlocal@mtvmail.com (June 9, 1998)
Maxine Hinds - MTV local
Jam Magazine, South Florida Edition Musician Directory Issue # 251, June 19 - July 2 1998 Review of "Deep Sky" Florida Independent Reviews Dean Madonia Deep Sky Soft Monkey Music, Inc. **** (four stars)

Dean Madonia takes us on an emotional journey with Deep Sky. As composer, arranger, vocalist, guitarist, and keyboard- ist, Madonia is one very talented fellow! The opening tune, "The War Came Home To Me," is a good overall mix of what is to come on the following tracks that range from rocking rhythyms to easy listening ballads. If a hit is a good song that stirs your emo- tions, Madonia has some sure- fire, heartfelt, winners on his hands! "Without A Net' and "Ill Fall in Love Again" are two examples of Madonia's passion. These are truly beautiful ballads that take us on an emotional journey without being "sappy." That's partly due to the order of the tracks. Rocking tunes like "The Falling Of Our Love," "Walking the Solitude," and "Wishbone" fall strategically between the easy listening tunes and ballads. Deep Sky, produced by Madonia and Mark Loren, car- ries your interest the whole way through and is definately a great musical work, with good hooks, instrumentation, vocal displays, and messages. Deep Sky is well worth keeping in your CD library to listen to over and over again. -Deborah Toby
Deborah Toby - Jam Magazine
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